Donors

Generous contributions from the following donors make VAYLA’s programming and organizing possible. Support us as we make a difference in the many lives of young people and the New Orleans community.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation supports children, families and communities as they strengthen and create conditions that propel vulnerable children to achieve success as individuals and as contributors to the larger community and society.

For more information, go to www.wkkf.org.

 

SEARAC is a national organization that advances the interests of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese Americans by empowering communities through advocacy, leadership development, and capacity building to create a socially just and equitable society. We envision a socially, politically and economically just society for all communities to enjoy for all generations.

For more information, go to www.searac.org.

 

The Funders’ Collaborative on Youth Organizing (FCYO) is a collective of national, regional and local grantmakers and youth organizing practitioners dedicated to advancing youth organizing as a strategy for youth development and social justice. The mission of the FCYO is to substantially increase the philanthropic investment in and strengthen the organizational capacities of youth organizing groups across the country.

For more information, go to www.fcyo.org.

 

Schott supports an “Opportunity to Learn” frame on educational policy, which focuses on ensuring that resources are provided for all students to have an equitable opportunity to learn and produce high achievement outcomes.  Schott maintains its historic commitment to institutionalizing an opportunity to learn standard in New York and Massachusetts, while recognizing the strategy for change, when possible, must extend beyond these two states. Schott supports a far reaching implementation strategy and infrastructure that is capable of maneuvering the dynamic relationship between national and state-based movement building to produce federal and state policies to protect an opportunity to learn for all students.

For more information, go to www.schottfoundation.org.

 

The Hill-Snowdon Foundation envisions a fair and just society for low-income families, particularly youth of color and no-and low-wage workers. Our mission is to work with low-income families and communities to create a fair and just society by helping them develop the capacity and leadership skills necessary to influence the decisions that shape their lives. We believe that it is essential for people to proactively define the type of society in which they want to live and then work collectively to achieve this vision. HSF seeks to accomplish this mission by providing grants to organizations that work directly to build the power of low-income families; leveraging our and others’ resources; and promoting opportunities for learning and growth.

For more information, go to www.hill-snowdon.org.

 

The Open Society Foundations work to build vibrant and tolerant societies whose governments are accountable and open to the participation of all people. We seek to strengthen the rule of law; respect for human rights, minorities, and a diversity of opinions; democratically elected governments; and a civil society that helps keep government power in check. We help to shape public policies that assure greater fairness in political, legal, and economic systems and safeguard fundamental rights. We implement initiatives to advance justice, education, public health, and independent media. We build alliances across borders and continents on issues such as corruption and freedom of information. Working in every part of the world, the Open Society Foundations place a high priority on protecting and improving the lives of people in marginalized communities.

For more information, go to www.opensocietyfoundations.org.

 

The Harrah’s Foundation serves as the principal funding entity for the company’s community and social investments. With the exception of required jurisdictional giving, the Foundation represents our source for funding programs and projects of at least $10,000. It prioritizes the strengthening of organizations and programs in the communities where our employees and their families live and work.

For more information, go to www.harrahsfoundation.com.

 

Surdna is a family foundation established in 1917 by John Emory Andrus. The foundation makes grants in the areas of environment, community revitalization, effective citizenry, the arts and the nonprofit sector, with annual grantmaking of approximately $37 million.

For more information, go to www.surdna.org.

 

The Academy for Educational Development (AED) is a nonprofit organization working globally to improve education, health, civil society and economic development–the foundation of thriving societies. AED’s mission is to make a positive difference in people’s lives by working in partnership to create and implement innovative solutions to critical social and economic problems.

For more information, go to www.aed.org.

 

The Rockefeller family has created the Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA), an independent, nonprofit service that develops and manages giving programs for individuals and families. RPA, located in New York City, is an outgrowth of the philanthropy office of Rockefeller Family Services, which advises Rockefeller family members and other clients on charitable giving in more than 40 countries.

Despite uneasiness about the economy, philanthropy in the United States is experiencing its biggest growth in 50 years, with total giving by independent foundations alone reaching $29 billion in 2001.

With over 100 years of experience and multigenerational giving, RPA is uniquely positioned to offer assistance to individuals and families who are contemplating or have recently begun philanthropic giving.

For more information, go to www.rockpa.org.

Additional donations provided by:
  • Edward W. Hazen Foundation
  • The McKay Foundation
  • Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation
  • Vietnamese American Community in Louisiana
  • Mary Queen of Viet Nam Community Development Corporation
  • Vietnamese Initiative in Economic Training
  • Mary Queen of Viet Nam Church
  • Loyola Asian Student Association
  • University of New Orleans – Vietnamese American Student Association
  • University of California, San Diego – Vietnamese Student Association
  • With additional support from individual donors